The link between the politics behind the Nobel Peace Prize and the so-called democracy movement in Hong Kong

November 18, 2014

First, according to the Democracy Index, in 2012, there were only 25 full democracies in the world while there were 51 authoritarian regimes. There were also 54 flawed democracies and 37 hybrid regimes. The Democracy Index is compiled by the Economist Intelligence Unit that measures the state of democracy in 167 countries, of which 166 are sovereign states and 165 are United Nations member states.

With the so-called democracy demonstrations taking place in Hong Kong—a former colony of the British Empire that was never a democracy by any definition—I want to make a link between those demonstrations and the Nobel Peace Prize.

Back in 2010, the media in democratic countries sounded the charge against China when Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Western media splashed the news on the Internet, across the front pages of newspapers and repeatedly reported it on TV and radio.

For example, The Huffington Post reported, “Imprisoned Chinese democracy campaigner Liu Xiaobo on Friday won the Nobel Peace Prize, an award that drew furious condemnation from the authoritarian government and calls from world leaders including President Barack Obama for Liu’s quick release.”

I’m sure that Liu Xiaobo believes in his mission as many in the West do, but I have to agree with America’s Founding Fathers. For instance President John Adams (1735 – 1826), the second president of the U.S., who said, “That the desires of the majority of the people are often for injustice and inhumanity against the minority is demonstrated by every page of the history of the whole world,” and “Democracy … while it lasts is more bloody than either [aristocracy or monarchy]. Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There is never a democracy that did not commit suicide.”

What about China soon after Mao’s death when Deng Xiaoping launched China’s economic capitalist revolution, and in 1982, China wrote the first draft of a constitution designed to build an authoritarian republic—not a democracy?

Since then, China has been moving slowly down a road toward a more representative republic that fits China’s culture, which might never accept Western democracy activists like Liu Xiaobo. I wonder what America’s Founding Fathers would have done with Liu Xiaobo—probably ignored him as most Americans would, but we might find an answer with how the U.S. deals with treason.

“Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.” 18 U.S. Code 2381 – Treason

What about China’s Constitution? After all, China does have a Constitution of its own.

For instance, there is Article 35: Citizens of the People’s Republic of China enjoy freedom of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of procession and of demonstration.

But there are also Articles 51, 52, 53 and 54:

Article 51: Citizens of the People’s Republic of China, in exercising their freedoms and rights, may not infringe upon the interests of the State, of society or of the collective, or upon the lawful freedoms and rights of other citizens.

Article 52: It is the duty of citizens of the People’s Republic of China to safeguard the unification of the country and the unity of all its nationalities.

Article 53: Citizens of the People’s Republic of China must abide by the Constitution and other laws, keep State secrets, protect public property, observe labour discipline and public order and respect social ethics.

Article 54: It is the duty of citizens of the People’s Republic of China to safeguard the security, honour and interests of the motherland; they must not commit acts detrimental to the security, honour and interests of the motherland.

Nobel Prizes are awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, which has been accused of having a political agenda. They have also been accused of Euro-centrism.

For the 2010 Nobel Prizes, there were five committee members, one man and four women—all white and old. Click the link and see for yourself.

In conclusion, I want to point out a few facts about China and its government that you probably will never hear from the mainstream Western media—especially in the United States.

Never before in China’s history has any government made an attempt to improve the lifestyles and welfare of its people. The World Bank reports that the CCP has lifted more than 600 million people out of poverty—90 percent of global poverty reduction in the last 30 years. Poverty in 1981 was 85 percent. In 2008, the World Bank reported it was 13 percent, lower than the poverty rate in the United States where poverty is increasing.

For more than two thousand years, China was known as the land of famines. In fact, Imperial records reveal that China had famines annually in one or more provinces, but under the CCP, the only famine was in 1958-1960—and the Western media has crucified the CCP repeatedly because of this famine and has never mentioned China’s annual history of  famines.

In 1949, when the CCP came to power, average life expectancy in China was age 35. Today it is 75. When Mao died, only 20 percent of Chinese were literate. Today, literacy is 95.1 percent.

If China is ruled by a brutal authoritarian government with a dictator—which isn’t true because its president may only serve two, five-year terms and the president’s power is limited—explain why an average of more than 50 million Chinese travel the world annually as tourists (more than any other country) and why many Chinese are free to go to college in the United States, and other countries, as foreign students.

Did you know that Xi Jinping, China current president, sent his daughter to college in the United States? In addition, in 2011, China send the most foreign students—194,029—to the USA, up 23% from the previous year.

There are more than 2,000 McDonald’s restaurants in China. KFC has more than 4,600. Pizza Hut has more than 1,200.  Walmart has been in China for 18 years and has about 90,000 employees. Starbucks is also in China and plans to have 1,500 stores by 2015.

Intel has research and manufacturing facilities in Beijing, Chengdu, Dalian, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

In 2012, 54 percent of urban Chinese were middle class and another 14 percent were upper middle class.

_______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of My Splendid Concubine [3rd edition]. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. This is the love story Sir Robert Hart did not want the world to discover.

Low-Res_E-book_cover_MSC_July_24_2013

Subscribe to “iLook China”!
Sign up for an E-mail Subscription at the top of this page, or click on the “Following” tab in the WordPress toolbar at the top of the screen.

About iLook China

China’s Holistic Historical Timeline

Advertisements

Democracy and Freedom – A Difference of Opinion

December 19, 2010

I’m sure that most Americans (as well educated as they are, and I’m being sarcastic) think all democracies are the same.

They aren’t.

The World Atlas lists 192 countries on the globe and according to Made in Democracies.org, there are 58 democracies. If correct, that means 134 countries are not democracies. This list excludes countries that claim they are democracies but are sanctioned tax havens for secret bank accounts or allow child prostitution.

If you read the entry for Democracy at Wikipedia, you will discover there are many different types of democracies.

The Economists Democracy Index has four categories. The next index from Freedom House has three.

In fact, Freedom House has another chart for Electoral democracies, which shrinks the list further.

There is another for Parliamentary democracies.

The smallest category may be for “liberal democracy” where elections should be free and fair, and the political process should be competitive. Even liberal democracies are divided into categories.

The United States is labeled as a federal republic along with India, Germany and Brazil.

The United Kingdom is listed as a constitutional monarchy along with Japan, Canada and Spain.

The biggest difference between China and most democracies is that China’s republic has one political party, which controls the state-owned media. Yet there are city and regional media in China that often publish opinions that do not appear in the national media. In addition, China’s Blogosphere is very active when it comes to expression and opinions.

In the US, six huge corporations own most of the so-called free media and an American corporation owns only one. Foreign corporations own the other five.

In America, freedom of the press means that conservative talk radio may manipulate public opinion and influence voters through lies and exaggeration, which it often does. We just saw that happen in the 2010 election.


This video explains how America became a democracy dominated by religion
.

In America, corporate lobbyists or special interest groups such as Evangelical Christians may influence elected officials to vote on bills that may not benefit the majority of the population such as confusing debates over abortion, global warming and the recent American health bill.

In China, the only way to influence a government official is by bribing him or her. If caught, that official may end up going to prison or face execution, which seldom happens in the US where bribed officials often go unpunished.

Although many call China a dictatorship, it is not. See Dictatorship Defined

Today, China is a one party republic, which is what the United States was under its first two presidents, George Washington and John Adams. In China, only Communist Party members may vote as part of a consensus and there are more than 70 million Party members.

In the American Republic created by the Founding Fathers in 1776, only white men that owned property were allowed to vote, which was about 10% of the population.

Critics of China claim that China’s 1982 Constitution allows for freedom of speech and religion. However, the truth is that there are limits on freedom of speech and religion that we never hear about from the Western media or politicians.

The US Constitution says, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

The Chinese Constitution says, “Citizens of the People’s Republic of China enjoy freedom of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of procession and of demonstration…”

Nowhere does it say in the Chinese Constitution, “the Party will make no law prohibiting the “free exercise of freedom of speech or of the press” as it does in the US Constitution.

In fact, the same article that says “Citizens of the People’s Republic of China enjoy freedom of religious belief” also says, “No one may make use of religion to engage in activities that disrupt public order, impair the health of citizens or interfere with the educational system of the state.”

The Chinese Constitution also says, “The exercise by citizens of the People’s Republic of China of their freedoms and rights may not infringe upon the interests of the state…” and “they must not commit acts detrimental to the security, honour and interests of the motherland.”

That is why the Tibetan Dalai Lama lives in exile in India, the Falun Gong religious cult was banned in China in 1999 and Liu Xiaobo, the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, is in jail. They all refuse to abide by the 1982 Chinese Constitution.

______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 3/3

December 19, 2010

If you wish to learn more about Liu Xiaobo, there is a brief but flawed and biased biography that was written by Jean-Philippe Beja of Reporters Without Borders. The most revealing comments paint a portrait of Liu Xiaobo as a self-centered individual influenced by Western thought and literature.

Beja says, “Liu practiced a Nietzschean cult of the individual and took little interest in politics.” To understand Liu’s motives, one should understand how Nietzsche influenced the world.

Nietzsche was an influential German philosopher remembered for his concept of the superman and for his rejection of Christian values (he claimed God was dead); considered, along with Kierkegaard, to be a founder of existentialism (1844-1900).

In fact, Nietzsche’s ideas not only inspired Liu Xiaobo, they inspired Hitler since Nietzsche offered a philosophy for the Nazi ideology of a superior race, which exercised its power as the Nazi’s saw fit. 

Other warmongers also took up Nietzsche’s superman, God is dead philosophy, as well as other philosophers, artists and poets.

As you can see, Nietzsche’s widespread influence persists to this day. Source: Existential Murder: The Nietzsche Syndrome

When the 1989 Tiananmen Incident took place. Liu was a guest professor in Norway at Columbia University when the so-called “pro-democracy” movement (which was never a democracy movement) took place.

To learn what really caused the Tiananmen protests, I suggest you read and watch Part 7 of the BBC’s documentary of China’s Capitalist Revolution.

In fact, the BBC says, “The demonstrators did not begin by demanding democracy. Corruption, inflation and the hardship caused by economic reforms drove students and workers to confront the government and the army.”

Since China was shutting down the state-owned factories that were not productive and earning profits in the new capitalist economy, many workers lost their jobs. China was in transition from the old economy of Maoism to the new socialist capitalism of today’s.

Unrest was inevitable as was the violence that ended with the Tiananmen incident.  To allow the demonstrations to continue might have led to an insurrection and worse bloodshed and millions could have died.

Liu, with a PhD in literature from Beijing Normal University (influenced by the lies in the Western media) hurried home from Norway believing in the “so-called” pro-democracy demonstrations.

Bija writes that soon after Liu returned to China he took charge of the (student) negotiation to prevent greater bloodshed.

Without much evidence to support his claims, Bija writes that during the violent part of the (so-called) democracy movement, Liu took refuge in the Australian embassy but a sense of guilt drove him into the streets because “citizens and students who had taken part in the movement were being hunted down, arrested and executed.”

While cycling around Beijing Liu was arrested then spent 20 months in Qincheng prison. If the “citizens and students” that took part in the movement were being executed, why did Liu Xiaobo survive?

Return to Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 2 or start with Part 1

 ______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 2/3

December 18, 2010

If you read the demands of Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, you will know that he wants China to become a mirror image of the democracy that exists in the US, which even America’s Founding Fathers were against since the men who founded the US Republic in the late 18th century believed democracy led to mob rule and chaos, which is true.

If China were to implement the reforms Liu Xiaobo calls for in his Manifesto, most of the work China’s centeral government has accomplished in the last thirty years to improve literacy and the lifestyles of the Chinese would end and possibly be reversed.

What Liu Xiaobo did with his Manifesto is illegal in China and he had to know it.  All schoolchildren in China are taught the meaning of China’s 1982 Constitution, which opened doors to more freedom than most Chinese had ever experienced before.

There are three articles in China’s 1982 Constitution, which explain why Liu Xiaobo went to prison.

However, most in the West have no clue.

From China’s 1982 Constitution:

Article 51 — The exercise by citizens of the People’s Republic of China of their freedoms and rights may not infringe upon the interests of the state, of society and of the collective, or upon the lawful freedoms and rights of other citizens.

Article 53 — Citizens of the People’s Republic of China must abide by the constitution and the law, keep state secrets, protect public property and observe labour discipline and public order and respect social ethics.

Article 54 — It is the duty of citizens of the People’s Republic of China to safeguard the security, honour and interests of the motherland; they must not commit acts detrimental to the security, honour and interests of the motherland.

Prior to December 2008, Liu Xiaobo gathered 350 signatures of Chinese intellectuals and human rights activist to promote his ideas of political reform and democratization in the PRC.

Liu Xiaobo’s manifesto was published on December 10, 2008. Since then, more than 10,000 people inside and outside China signed Liu Xiaobo’s manifesto.

I live in the US in California.

In California, we have a process to get an initiative on the ballot to change the laws in California. 

However, in the U.S. currently, less than half the states permit the initiative process.

In California, Ballot.org says the number of qualified signatures needed is 433,971 for a statutory initiative and 694,354 for a constitutional amendment, which is what Liu Xiaobo and his supporters are calling for in China where there is no initiative process.

California has more than 37 million people. China has more than 1.3 billion.

 In 1949, when the Communists won the Civil War, most of China lived lifestyles similar to Europe’s Dark Ages. However, since the early 1980s, the standard of living and the literacy level in China has continued to improve at an impressive rate for about three decades.

Why does Liu Xiaobo want to change something that still works? In Part 3, you will learn something about Liu Xiaobo and what he believes.

Return to Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 1 or go to Part 3

 ______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 1/3

December 18, 2010

First, a question — how often in history has an established government stepped aside and allowed another political structure to replace it without a bloody rebellion?

“Charter 08” is Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto calling for democratic reforms in China that would sweep aside the established political system opening the door to chaos and anarchy — a return to the first half of the twentieth century.

To understand what would happen to China if Liu’s Manifesto for democracy were implemented, it helps to know some history.

I’ll start with the Communist Manifesto.

Online Schools.org says, “The Communist Manifesto is considered one of the most influential political manuscripts ever written…. it was composed by German communist thinkers Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. The Communist Manifesto, also known as the Manifesto of the Communist Party, was published on February 21, 1848.

The Communist Manifesto led to the bloody Russian, Chinese and Cuban revolutions and eventually to the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam War. To replace old political structures with what the Communist Manifesto proposed cost tens of millions of lives and much suffering.

Even the American and French Republics were born in the 18th century of bloody revolutions and China has already been through one bloody revolution between the Communist and Nationalist (KMT) parties that lasted from 1925 to 1949 soon after Dr. Sun Yat-sen died. To discover more of this era, learn from The Roots of Madness

I admit that I did not know much about the crime that Liu Xiaobo was guilty of that landed him in a Chinese prison for eleven years. I knew as much as most in the West that he was an advocate for democracy and earned an eleven-year prison sentence for his beliefs.

However, to learn more about why a Chinese court sentenced Liu Xiaobo to eleven years in prison for subversion, Google led me to a New Zealand site where I learned about Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto.

Since the Western media seldom goes into detail beyond the fact that Liu Xiaobo is an activist for democracy in China, I was ignorant of the history behind Liu’s movement.

If you are interested in seeing the list of the demands Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto makes, visit Charter 08 at Wikipedia.

In Part two, I will examine how Liu Xiaobo broke China’s laws and earned a prison sentence. Click here to go to Liu Xiaobo’s Manifesto, Charter 08 – Part 2

______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Crackdown on Ignorance

October 10, 2010

Today, Yahoo News posted an Associated Press piece by Gillian Wong.

The lead paragraph says, “An imprisoned Chinese dissident who won this year’s Nobel Peace Prize was allowed to meet Sunday with his wife and told her in tears that he was dedicating the award to the victims of a 1989 military crackdown on pro-democracy protesters…”

When I wrote about part seven of a BBC documentary of China’s Capitalist Revolution, I said, “The protesters were not demanding Western style politics or an end to Communist Party rule as many in the West believe. They wanted the government to listen to their opinions about reforms and corruption.”

The banners the protesters carried said, “We support the Great Glorious Communist Party of China.”

There was no pro-democracy movement. The protest happened impulsively and got out of control like so many things young people do.

Since when has any country allowed hormone driven college students decide the course of a nation? 

The reason those students became heroes in the West was because the Western media made them heroes and turned the fiction of a pro-democracy movement into a fact believed by hundreds of millions.

It seems that Liu Xiaobo believes that fiction too.

If Liu Xiaobo wants to dedicate his Noble Peace Prize to anyone, it should be to the victims of the 2/28 Massacre in Taiwan where almost 30 thousand were killed by Chiang Kai-shek’s troops.

However, the reason few in the West know of this massacre was that Chiang Kai-shek was not only a brutal dictator but a converted Christian and an American ally.

It is regrettable that hundreds of misguided college students lost their lives during the Tiananmen Square Incident, but that doesn’t compare to what happened in Taiwan decades earlier.

In fact, what those unorganized students in Tiananmen Square accomplished in 1989 almost stopped Deng Xiaoping’s economic reforms from succeeding. Source: Chinese Pod

See Nobel Peace Prize goes to Liu Xiaobo

______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. 

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.


Nobel Peace Prize goes to Liu Xiaobo

October 8, 2010

Democratic trumpets are sounding the charge against China.

Sinophobes are shouting, “I told you so!”

The Western media is splashing the news on the Internet, across the front pages of newspapers and reporting it on TV and radio.

For example, The Huffington Post says, “Imprisoned Chinese democracy campaigner Liu Xiaobo on Friday won the Nobel Peace Prize, an award that drew furious condemnation from the authoritarian government and calls from world leaders including President Barack Obama for Liu’s quick release.”

Outside the Middle Kingdom, the government of China cannot win this public relations battle against democratic nations unified in their condemnation of non-democratic governments—at least those governments that do not have lots of underground oil as the authoritarian government in Saudi Arabia.

I’m sure that Liu Xiaobo believes in his mission as many in the West do that live in democracies.

However, I agree with America’s Founding Fathers, who in 1776 founded a republic—not the democracy the U.S. has today.

President John Adams (1735 – 1826), the second president of the U.S., said, “That the desires of the majority of the people are often for injustice and inhumanity against the minority is demonstrated by every page of the history of the whole world,” and “Democracy … while it lasts is more bloody than either [aristocracy or monarchy]. Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There is never a democracy that did not commit suicide.”

Mao was a dictator known as China’s modern emperor.

A few years after coming to power in 1949, Mao launched the disastrous Great Leap Forward followed by the infamy of The Cultural Revolution—both were driven by the mob and the results were about 30 million dead from famine, disease and tyranny.

In fact, before the communists came to power in China, there was more than a century of madness that almost destroyed China, which was caused by the West.

Soon after Mao died, Deng Xiaoping launched China’s capitalist revolution.

Then in 1982, China wrote the first draft of a constitution designed to build a republic – not a democracy.

Since then, China has been moving slowly down a road toward a more representative republic that fits China’s culture, which will probably never include democratic activists like Liu Xiaobo.

I hope China never becomes the kind of democracy President John Adams warned America against. It may be too late for the U.S. to return to the republic America’s Founding Fathers built, but it isn’t too late for China to avoid the same trap as they mature into a freer republic for the Chinese people.

Right or wrong, China’s central government does not want mob rule and that is the reason they locked up Liu Xiaobo and silenced his voice in China.

It is obvious that The Nobel Peace Prize has become a political tool to spread the mob rule of democracy that America’s Founding Fathers warned us about.

I urge China to release Liu Xiaobo from prison then send him to the democracy of his choice and never let him return.

Once living in Norway or France, maybe Liu Xiaobo will write a book about his experiences then win the Noble Prize for Literature.

I wonder what America’s Founding Fathers would have done with a Liu Xiaobo – probably ignored him as most Americans would have done then.

Nobel Prizes are awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, which has been accused of having a political agenda. They have also been accused of Eurocentrism.

For the 2010 Nobel Prizes, there were five committee members, one man and four women.

______________

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too. 

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.