Combating Virtual Pornography in China

January 14, 2011

I had a good laugh when I read a BBC report on China rewards online porn surfer. A Chinese college student’s addicted to on-line porn ruined his chances of getting into a top university and ended in a junior college.

Now, this student is getting even with those that feed his addiction.

Since this unnamed student from northern Shanxi province couldn’t control his addiction, he decided to wage war against the porn industry by reporting porn sites to China’s censors and ended up being rewarded with 10,000 yuan ($1,465US or £913UK).

Just how serious is China’s government in combating porn? Back in February 2010, I reported China’s Stylish Assault Against Pornography. In fact, in the war against pornography, China recruited mothers.  Now China is recruiting Chinese addicted to porn.

Since that report almost a year ago, what have been the results of China’s war against porn?


Google warned to cut links to porn.

According to Politik Ditto, a Website claiming to be fighting Liberal Terrorism, “Around 1,330 people (in China) received punishments for producing, duplicating, publishing, selling and spreading pornographic and vulgar information from December 2009 to October 2010, and among them five were given prison sentences of five years or more…”

In fact, the Supreme People’s Court issued a judicial interpretation on crimes of spreading obscene content via Internet…

If you believe China is a country without morality, you are wrong! Instead of coming from the pulpit of a church since china has no established national religion as most countries do, China’s morality is measured by the government.

However, this isn’t new and has nothing to do with Communism. The measure of morality in China has “always” come from the family and the government and is often Puritanical. Under Mao during the Cultural Revolution (1966 – 1976), a forbidden teen romance could end in an execution.

If you read my post of Gwyneth Paltrow Popular in China, you would know that guidelines on movies in China are strict: “No sex.  No religion. Nothing to do with the occult. Nothing that could threaten public morality or portray criminal behavior…”

Being “somewhat” Puritanical myself, I applaud China’s war against pornography.

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

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Internet Security in China

November 24, 2010

We must be careful not to allow the “free” Western media, which often practices the exaggerations of Yellow Journalism to gain a larger audience share, to turn us into virtual on-line paranoid freaks.

In fact, Americans seldom hear that other nations around the globe also have the same challenges with Internet Security as the US does.

The following newscast from CCTV proves that we are not alone. The Chinese also suffer from virtual viruses and crimes.

It doesn’t take a government-funded agency to create a virus or other Internet threats. Any hacker may do so, and China Internet Watch reported 420 million Chinese Internet users on-line in 2010.

China has a National Computer Network Emergency Response Center. In 2009, the Center said, “Internet security cases have been on the rise in recent years posing severe challenges to information safety (in China).

“Hackers can profit from renting or selling computer information.… This crime has caused over 4.5 billion yuan in losses.”

The Center says, “The number of viruses and assaults launched by hackers number in the tens of thousands and the number of attacks is rising by one-third each year.”

The Ministry of Public Security and State Information Center has launched an exclusive campaign to protect Internet security.

For example, in December 2009, China found eleven guilty in a virus case and sent the defendants to jail for up to three years for their role in creating on-line viruses in east China. This on-line gang reportedly made illegal gains of 646,000 yuan or about 94,600 US dollars.

It was reported that 80 people across China were involved in this crime and more trials were expected.

Learn more from Tom Carter about Crime in China

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

If you want to subscribe to iLook China, there is a “Subscribe” button at the top of the screen in the menu bar.