The Japanese, Manchukuo, and the Collaborators

This post is an example of the dangers of bias that blinds individuals to reality.

Recently, I had a run-in on Quora with an alleged woman who claimed that many Chinese collaborators that cooperated with the Japanese in Manchuria between 1931 and 1945 were Han Chinese. This alleged woman went on to claim that today many of them were powerful members of China’s government. From his/her comments, it was easy to imagine this anonymous person foaming at the mouth in rage as they pounded on their keyboard. When I challenged this person to provide links to support their allegations, there was no reply.

If any Chinese are alive today that collaborated with the Japanese in Manchuria and China between 1931 and 1945, and were at least 18 years old at the time they enlisted, the oldest would have to be 106; the youngest 92.

For instance, Henry Puyi was allegedly one of the most influential collaborators that worked with the Japanese, and he wasn’t even Han. He was Manchurian. The Japanese initially installed Puyi as Head of State in 1932, and two years later he was declared Emperor of Manchukuo with the era name of Kangde. Puyi was twenty-six in 1932, and he died in 1967. Puyi was never a member of the Chinese Communist Party.

The Japanese invasion of Manchuria took place on September 18, 1931, eighty-eight years ago.  According to historical records, “In total, it was estimated that all pro-Japanese collaborationist Chinese forces (in all of China) combined had a strength of around 683,000. … And there were numerous other collaborationist units that operated in other parts of China under the Japanese. The most notable were the armed forces of the separate puppet state of Manchukuo.”

NOTE: In 1931, China’s population was almost 475-million people. That means the collaborators made up close to one-tenth of one percent of the population.

In addition, Britannica.com says, “They (in 1937, the People’s Liberation Army led by Mao) eventually reached northwestern China, which was closer to the area that by then was occupied by Japanese troops. Led by Mao Zedong, the communists responded to the growing anti-Japanese sentiment of their countrymen by calling on the KMT to join with them in expelling the Japanese.”

Xi Jinping, China’s current President was born in 1953, eight years after the end of World War II. Including Xi Xinping, there are 25 members of China’s Politburo, the group that holds the most power in China. The oldest four members of the Politburo were born in 1950; the youngest in 1963. None of them were alive during World War II.

China’s National People’s Congress has 2,980 delegates. Npobserver.com reports, “The 2,980 delegates are on average 52 years old, with most (1,632 or 54.8%) in the 50–59 age group. The youngest six delegates are 22 years old, while the oldest delegate, Ms. SHEN Jilan from Shanxi, is 88; she has been a delegate since the 1st NPC.”

There is only one delegate older than 80, and that is Ms. SHEN Jilan from Shanxi. Jilan was born the year Japan invaded Manchuria and turned 14 when World War II ended. I doubt that Jilan was running around in diapers collaborating with the Japanese. According to the China Daily, “She has been a farmer for her whole life. She is also a lifetime national lawmaker. … Shen is from a remote village in the mountains of Taihang, a revolutionary base of the Communist Party of China (CPC) in North China’s Shanxi province.”

I think it is too easy for anonymous individuals to make any claims their twisted minds think up and then share them through the internet. It is also obvious that there are too many people that believe these false and misleading allegations. I mean, just look at how many Americans think President Donald Trump is the “Chosen One” because Trump says so. If you do not know what that means to Trump’s hard-core followers, the “Chosen One” is someone anointed by God to save the world … or America from socialists and Communists.

Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of My Splendid Concubine, Crazy is Normal, Running with the Enemy, and The Redemption of Don Juan Casanova.

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5 Responses to The Japanese, Manchukuo, and the Collaborators

  1. Josepa says:

    Excellent articles shedding light on China’s history;… in a media-world flooded with anti-communist propaganda to an extent of “lying too much”….Dikotter style.
    (I am not a communist fan but a true history/geopolitics fan)
    I found your blog looking for alternate perspectives after reading the usual articles on Mao, full of canned clitches,….superficial standard propaganda that get me fed-up.
    By the way, I see that you gave up posting in this blog ¿do you intend to post about China/East Asia in other blog?
    Thanks

    • Josepa, thank you.

      I didn’t give up blogging to give up blogging. I stopped because WordPress changed the editor program where we post/write our work. My perception is that the changes were drastically different from what I was using.

      I learned how to use WordPress’s Classic Editor program a decade ago and wrote and posted several thousand posts for my four blogs with it.

      I think the new Block (headed) Editor program is confusing and at this time I do not want to go through the frustrating learning curve to figure out how to use it. It has been my experience, that WordPress’s How-To videos and the advice their “Happiness Engineers” (yes, this is what WordPress calls their technicians) often do not match what I have on my screen making it even more difficult to learn.

      I do not want the frustration and stress that comes with the poorly planned and designed change from WordPress. I decided to keep the blogs but take a long break from posting new stuff until I finish my next novel and publish it. Then I might (no guarantee) see if I can learn the new WordPress editing program without shooting my computer with one of my shotguns..

      Sincerely,
      Lloyd Lofthouse

  2. Voltaire says:

    Thank you, sir!

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