The Rape of Nanking

Warning, the video linked to this post may be disturbing. 

Although China and Nanking suffered from internal war and strife, China never invaded another nation in its four-thousand year history. China had always been self-sufficient and never needed anything from other countries. To wage war on its neighbors was not part of the Chinese character. 

Nanking was the capital of China from the third to the 6th century. In the 14th century, the first Ming Emperor made Nanking the capital again. To protect the capital, the largest city wall in the world was built. It was fifty -feet high, forty-feet wide and more than twenty-five miles long.

On July 1937, Japan attacked China. Chiang Kai-shek made himself the commander of China’s army and navy.  The battle for Shanghai came first. Tens of thousands of innocent Chinese were killed while 300 thousand Chinese troops died. After losing Shanghai, the Chinese army retreated to Nanking.

The Japanese soldiers were ordered to burn all, steal all, and kill all as they advanced through the countryside toward Nanking. It is estimated that 300 thousand innocent Chinese were murdered. 

For over one-hundred days, Japanese bombers bombed Nanking, while Chinese troops fought fiercely defending the city. Eventually, Chang Kai-shek fled with most of his generals and government officials, but ordered one general to stay behind with the army and fight.

As Nanking fell to the Japanese, mostly women, children and the elderly were killed by the tens of thousands. 

Part 2 continues the Rape of Nanking and it is so shocking and disturbing, you must go to YouTube and sign in showing that you are at least 18. If you do not wish to watch Part 2, the next post will continue to report about the Rape of Nanking, and it will not be as disturbing.

Go to Part 2, The Rape of Nanking

Also see The Roots of Madness

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Lloyd Lofthouse is the award-winning author of the concubine saga, My Splendid Concubine & Our Hart. When you love a Chinese woman, you marry her family and culture too.

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